Archives for posts with tag: Jeff Goldblum

“The Big Chill” (1983) is an interesting setup and a great ending sandwiched around entirely too much tiresome baby boomer midlife crisis self-analysis. That’s why, as a film, this movie is no longer relevant to anyone other than those baby boomers who see themselves in the movie’s characters (with all due respect). However, it remains hugely significant in that its soundtrack of familiar hit songs helped change how music and movies interacted (and were marketed). And the incredibly positive audience response to said music helped inspire a radio format concept (classic rock) that remains popular 30 years after the film.

As I watched “Isle of Dogs” (2018), I was reminded how much I used to enjoy “Samurai Jack.” There’s a zen-like inner calmness at the center of these two pieces of Japanese-flavored animation that I savored. This film is loaded with metaphors for all kinds of stuff I didn’t have time to try to discern (it’s a dark story about the potential for a doggie holocaust, and there’s heavy – perhaps too heavy – political symbolism). I was too busy either trying to make out the tiny writing on my normal-human-sized television or I was simply enjoying the calm, deliberate, confident storytelling.

“Silverado” is fun. A throwback western made at a time (1985) when people weren’t making many westerns. Fun for audiences. While it’s true to the genre, everyone plays it with a wink and a nod, especially Non-cowboyish actors like John Cleese, Danny Glover, Jeff Goldblum and Kevin Kline. Decked out in period costumes and riding horses, they go about their business with gusto instead of looking like fish out of water. But Kevin Costner has the most fun of all in a bouncing-off-the-walls supporting role as Scott Glenn’s fun-loving, trouble-making little brother who can spin a six-shooter in either hand.