Archives for posts with tag: Hugh Grant

It was an inspired bit of casting for writer-director Guy Ritchie to make former heartthrob Hugh Grant the weasely linchpin of his British caper flick “The Gentlemen” (2020). Ritchie brings a unique style to this type of film and Grant proves to be a worthy air traffic controller as scenes cut from one character’s perspective to another and back and forth across time. Matthew McConaughey is trying to sell his (illegal) business and he thinks he has a buyer, but cutthroat hijinks ensue. There’s bullets, blood and belly-laughs – sometimes all at once. Ritchie makes it look easier than it is.

It’s easy to write off “Cocktail” as a formulaic modern romantic comedy, except, technically, the formula didn’t exist yet. Tom Cruise made this movie in 1988, six years before one Hugh John Mungo Grant’s p-whipped ass showed up in “Four Weddings and a Funeral.” But Cruise does play the boy-who-never-grew-up, he does get his comeuppance, his id (played by Bryan Brown) gets slain and Cruise does, indeed, get p-whipped. So it’s kind of a beta version. Personally, I wouldn’t have been caught dead in such high-end bars with such douchey, bottle-slinging bartenders as Cruise and Brown back in 1988. Still wouldn’t.

I watched “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” (2015) with my mom, who is old enough to remember the 1960s TV show. Her assessment? “I liked it, but I don’t think young people would like it, because it’s too quiet.” What she means is that while it’s an action movie, it’s not a video game or a comic book. It’s an actual spy movie with an actual spy plot, human-scale action sequences, and a stylish level of subtlety and pacing that might come across as “quiet” to an 83-year-old woman. Or “boring” to a 16-year-old boy; thus its box-office struggles not surprising.