Archives for posts with tag: Alan Arkin

“Coupe de Ville” was a mediocre snowflake in the avalanche of period, coming-of-age movies released around 1990. Like the others, it looks back wistfully at the late 1950s-early 1960s and tries to impart some kind of simplistic, baby-boomer value lesson. The lesson here seems to be that warts and all, it’s still important to stay connected to one’s family. My biggest takeaway from this road movie was the family that screams together stays together. Geez! The yelling!! Enough already!!! I thought uptight Daniel Stern (playing the oldest of three stereotypical, bickering brothers) was going to drop dead at any minute.

I’m old enough to have seen the original “Going in Style” in the early 1980s, back when Hollywood movies would show up on network TV a year later. The original old-men-rob-a-bank flick, with George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg, was more poignant. The 2017 remake, with Alan Arkin, Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman, is more polished for a modern audience. They’re both good. As usual, Arkin inhabits his grumpy-old-man character like none other. I wanted someone to explain to me why Caine, with his English accent, worked in a Queens (New York, not THE queen) steel mill for 30 years.

If you were a sports agent who invited dozens of media members and baseball scouts to see a couple of unknown Indian kids, you would not wear a Los Angeles Dodgers hat at the tryout. (OK, I got that off my chest.) “Million Dollar Arm” (2014) stars a cliche of a hotshot agent who thinks India might be an untapped source of baseball talent – and baseball marketing dollars. There’s an awkwardly forced love interest subplot, too. Everyone learns a lot about themselves (it’s a Disney film). Just meh. In India, cows may have souls. Unfortunately, “Million Dollar Arm” does not.