It’s quite the trick to tell a story that is both anti-gun and supportive of stand-your-ground doctrine. I’m almost positive director Brad Bird was going for only one half of that equation in “The Iron Giant” (1999), but I’m going to stand my ground, too. Aside from the deep-thinky pacifist stuff, this stylish piece of children’s animation is the classic story of the (mostly) gentle giant who is (mostly) misunderstood by the townsfolk, government, etc. Except for the kid who befriends him, of course. It all gets magnified through a Cold War paranoia lens and leads to a dramatic climax.

As much as I loved Nicolas Cage in his weirder-than-weird “Willy’s Wonderland,” it was just too much of a struggle to love the even weirder “The Unbearable Weight of Massive Talent” (2022). Cage is a strange dude in real life (ask the IRS) who apparently isn’t afraid to parody himself and his film roles, which “Massive Talent” accomplishes to pull off this Escher drawing of a movie-inside-a-movie-about-a-movie. A trip to Spain for a quick buck and a script-reading takes an awkward turn toward guns-blazing hijinks. Cage is sooo uncomfortably strange, it’s hard to see where reality ends and parody begins.

Sometimes I wonder what happened to Chris Tucker. Then I realize that he was just a prototype that got mothballed when the smaller, more powerful Kevin Hart was released. Tucker’s career is pretty much defined by “Rush Hour” (1998), a standard, 1990s buddy-cop action flick. He’s in full Hollywood Shuffle mode playing a motormouthed Eddie Murphy for a cheap rip-off of “Beverly Hills Cop.” There are typical international crime hijinks and even a heavyset nemesis detective with a handlebar mustache. Fortunately, layered on top of that mediocrity is Jackie Chan’s incredibly choreographed fight scenes. It’s worth seeing just for those.