Back in 1998, when not everybody had cable, TNT took a bunch of movie stars and threw them together with a B-list cross between Ryan Gosling and Ryan Reynolds for a film that turns out to be a rom-com hiding inside a legal procedural. “Legalese” stars James Garner (who, admittedly, is also a TV star) as a high-profile L.A. attorney asked to defend a movie star (Gina Gershon) accused of murder. Edward Kerr is Garner’s neophyte protégé. Mary-Louise Parker is Garner’s more experienced protégé and Kerr’s rom-com foil. The rest is dull-edged satire about lawyers, television, journalism and pop culture.

Anson Mount the actor is not related to Rick Mount the basketball legend, but Anson gets to play in a hitman version of March Madness in “The Virtuoso” (2021). He’s struggling with a bad outcome from a recent job and a client thinks a little competition (and Abbie Cornish) will make him feel better. Mount has a great voice, almost too good. Sometimes he sounds like an automated attendant. This complicates his role as the film’s main narrator, since I almost felt like I was watching a hitman documentary. Or maybe a commercial for an upscale product preferred by hitmen.

You know all those movies where the bad guy looks at the good guy and says, “we’re not so different, you and I?” That concept is the poignant, underlying theme of “Donnie Brasco” (1997). Johnny Depp is the young, family man, undercover FBI agent and Al Pacino is the world-weary mob wiseguy, but they’re not so different. They’re both mid-level grinders, bound together, trying to do their best while their bosses take advantage of them. The allure of being someone he’s not has Depp turning away from his own life of quiet desperation, but is the alternative that different? Fuggedaboutit.