The most interesting thing about “Trigger Point” (2021) is that it was produced by Chicken Soup for the Soul Entertainment, “a socially conscious company that combines storytelling with making the world a better place.” I shit you not. I guess a movie about a good CIA assassin killing a bunch of bad CIA assassins makes the fictional world a better place. Fixing the muddy backstory, cliche shadowy criminal mastermind, and highly unsatisfying ending would have made my world a better place. Barry Pepper may have a mediocre franchise on his hands, which I guess makes his world a better place.

Many of my reviews are facetious, but “Man On Fire” (2004) is too good to deserve that. It’s also too dark for some people to like or understand. I think that says more about those people than about the movie itself. It’s beautiful and ugly, jarring and tender, bloody and ethereal. Denzel Washington, an alcoholic former (CIA?) assassin, turns up in Mexico. His paramilitary buddy, Christopher Walken, helps him get a job as a little girl’s bodyguard, setting off a story of vengeance, amorality, justice and classic movie lines. Forgiveness? That’s God’s job. Denzel’s just there to arrange the meeting.

Hollywood likes bundling a bunch of good-looking teenageish boys for movies about Texas football because it checks off boxes in a whole bunch of marketing demographics. The latest installment of inspiring underdog gridiron mediocrity is “12 Mighty Orphans” (2021). Based on a true story (aren’t they all?), this heartwarming tale of Dust Bowl grit, determination and long speeches by Luke Wilson introduces us to a Fort Worth children’s home that captured a Depression-era nation’s attention. The filmmakers inject it with the typical melodramatic steroids of teenage hijinks and overbaked subplots. Still, it’s worth waiting for the mini-bios during the credits.